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Crack Powerbuilder 125 Classic And Net


PowerBuilder 125 Classic and .NET: What You Need to Know




PowerBuilder is a powerful and versatile development tool that has been around for more than three decades. It allows you to create rich client-server and Windows Forms applications using a graphical user interface and an object-oriented programming language. PowerBuilder 125 is the latest version of this tool, and it comes with two separate IDEs: PowerBuilder Classic and PowerBuilder .NET.


In this article, we will explain the differences between these two IDEs, the benefits of using PowerBuilder .NET, and how to migrate your existing PowerBuilder Classic applications to PowerBuilder .NET.


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PowerBuilder Classic vs PowerBuilder .NET




PowerBuilder Classic is the familiar IDE that you have been using in earlier PowerBuilder releases. It retains the same basic functionality and features, such as DataWindow technology, PFC framework, EAServer support, and .NET Assembly target type. You can continue to develop and maintain your existing client-server and Windows Forms applications using PowerBuilder Classic.


PowerBuilder .NET is the new IDE that hosts the Visual Studio isolated shell and is designed for compliance with the common language specifications for .NET. It allows you to create modern applications that leverage the .NET Framework and its libraries, such as Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), Windows Communication Foundation (WCF), and Entity Framework. PowerBuilder .NET includes one new target type (WPF Window Application) and two new project types (WPF Window and WCF Client Proxy). You can migrate your PowerBuilder Classic targets to PowerBuilder .NET using the WPF Window Application target wizard.


Why Use PowerBuilder .NET?




PowerBuilder .NET offers several advantages over PowerBuilder Classic, such as:



  • Improved user interface: You can create rich and interactive user interfaces using WPF, which is a declarative markup language that supports data binding, animations, styles, templates, and more. You can also use XAML Designer to visually design your WPF windows and controls.



  • Enhanced language features: You can use language enhancements that are supported by the .NET Framework, such as generics, delegates, events, anonymous methods, lambda expressions, extension methods, LINQ, and more. You can also use C# or VB.NET as your scripting language for your WPF windows.



  • Access to .NET libraries: You can access the vast collection of .NET libraries and frameworks that provide various functionalities, such as data access, web services, security, networking, cryptography, XML processing, and more. You can also use third-party .NET components and assemblies in your applications.



  • Better performance: You can benefit from the performance improvements of the .NET Framework, such as just-in-time compilation, garbage collection, exception handling, and more. You can also use native code generation to optimize your applications for speed and size.



  • Easier deployment: You can deploy your applications using ClickOnce or Windows Installer technology, which simplifies the installation and update process for your end users. You can also use application settings to store and retrieve configuration data for your applications.




How to Migrate to PowerBuilder .NET?




If you want to migrate your existing PowerBuilder Classic applications to PowerBuilder .NET, you can use the WPF Window Application target wizard. This wizard will guide you through the steps of creating a new WPF Window Application target based on your existing client-server or Windows Forms target. It will also convert your existing windows, menus, user objects, DataWindows, structures, global variables, functions, events, scripts, and resources to their equivalent in PowerBuilder .NET.


The migration process is not fully automatic, however. You may need to manually modify some of your code or logic to make it compatible with PowerBuilder .NET. For example:



  • You may need to replace some unsupported features or controls with their alternatives in PowerBuilder .NET. For example, OLE controls are not supported in WPF windows; you may need to use ActiveX controls instead.



  • You may need to adjust some of your UI elements or layouts to fit the WPF design principles. For example, WPF windows do not have title bars or system menus; you may need to add custom buttons or menus instead.



  • You may need to rewrite some of your scripts or expressions to use the .NET syntax or libraries. For example, string manipulation functions are different in PowerScript and C#; you may need to use the String class methods instead.




For more information about the migration process and the differences between PowerBuilder Classic and PowerBuilder .NET, you can refer to the [PowerBuilder .NET Features Guide].


Conclusion




PowerBuilder 125 Classic and .NET are two separate IDEs that offer different capabilities and features for developing applications. PowerBuilder Classic is the traditional IDE that you can use to maintain your existing client-server and Windows Forms applications. PowerBuilder .NET is the new IDE that you can use to create modern applications that leverage the .NET Framework and its libraries. You can migrate your PowerBuilder Classic applications to PowerBuilder .NET using the WPF Window Application target wizard, but you may need to manually modify some of your code or logic to make it compatible with PowerBuilder .NET.


We hope this article has given you a clear overview of PowerBuilder 125 Classic and .NET, and how to migrate your applications from one IDE to another. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to contact us.


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